What Is Behind Night Sweat?

Night sweats, or excessive sweating during sleep, are a common symptom in women and men.

Doctors treat the problem by diagnosing the cause of your night sweats.

What are night sweats?

Doctors in primary care fields of medicine often hear their patients complain of night sweats because they are common. Night sweats refer to any excess sweating occurring during the night. However, if you keep your bedroom temperature unusually hot or you are sleeping in too many clothes, you may sweat during your sleep, which is normal. In order to distinguish night sweats that arise from medical causes from those that occur because one’s surroundings are too warm, doctors generally refer to true night sweats as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets, which are not related to an overheated environment.

In one study of 2267 patients visiting a primary care doctor, 41% reported experiencing night sweats during the previous month, so the perception of excessive sweating at night is common. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or trunk) also may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats.

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What Are Night Sweats a Sign Of?

Medically Reviewed on 2/25/2021

A woman in bed sweating. Many medical conditions and diseases can cause night sweats.Source: Getty Imagesnull

Night sweats facts

Night sweats, or excessive sweating during sleep, are a common symptom in women and men.

Doctors treat the problem by diagnosing the cause of your night sweats.

What are night sweats?

Doctors in primary care fields of medicine often hear their patients complain of night sweats because they are common. Night sweats refer to any excess sweating occurring during the night. However, if you keep your bedroom temperature unusually hot or you are sleeping in too many clothes, you may sweat during your sleep, which is normal. In order to distinguish night sweats that arise from medical causes from those that occur because one’s surroundings are too warm, doctors generally refer to true night sweats as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets, which are not related to an overheated environment.null

In one study of 2267 patients visiting a primary care doctor, 41% reported experiencing night sweats during the previous month, so the perception of excessive sweating at night is common. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or trunk) also may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats.

A man in bed with a fever sweating. Night sweats due to the menopausal transition are typically accompanied by other symptoms of menopause such as vaginal dryness, daytime hot flashes, and mood changes.Source: iStock

What are other signs and symptoms of night sweats?

Depending upon the underlying cause of the night sweats, other symptoms may occur in association with sweating. For example:

  • Certain infections and cancers
  • Shaking and chills can sometimes occur if you have a fever.
  • Unexplained weight loss due to lymphoma.
  • Night sweats due to the menopausal transition are typically accompanied by other symptoms of menopause such as vaginal dryness, daytime hot flashes, and mood changes.
  • Night sweats that occur as a side effect of medications can be accompanied by other medication side effects, depending upon the specific drug. Read More

What Is Impingement syndrome?

Impingement syndrome is a common condition affecting the shoulder often seen in aging adults. This condition is closely related to shoulder bursitis and rotator cuff tendonitis. These conditions may occur alone or in combination.

In virtually all parts of your body, bones are the innermost structures and are surrounded by muscles. When an injury occurs to the rotator cuff muscles, they respond by swelling. However, because the rotator cuff muscles are surrounded by bone, when they swell, a series of other events occur.

The pressure within the muscles increases, which results in compression and loss of blood flow in the small blood vessels. When the blood flow decreases, the muscle tissue begins to fray like a rope. Motions such as reaching up behind the back and reaching up overhead to put on a coat or blouse, for example, may cause pain.

What Are the Symptoms of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome?

The typical symptoms of impingement syndrome include difficulty reaching up behind the back, pain with overhead use of the arm and weakness of shoulder muscles.

If these muscles are injured for a long period of time, the muscle can actually tear in two, resulting in a rotator cuff tear. This causes significant weakness and may make it difficult for the person to elevate his or her arm. Some people will have rupture of their biceps muscle as part of this continuing impingement process.

How Is Impingement Syndrome Diagnosed?

Diagnosis begins with a medical history and physical examination by your doctor. X-rays will be taken to rule out arthritis and may show changes in the bone that indicate injury of the muscle. Bone spurs or changes in the normal contour of the bone may be present. Impingement syndrome may be confirmed when an injection of a small amount of an anesthetic into the space under one of the shoulder bones relieves pain.

How Is Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Treated?

It is important to understand that the condition and not just the symptoms require treatment. Oral anti-inflammatory medications ?such as aspirinnaproxen or ibuprofen, remain the most common treatment for this condition.

You must consistently take the medication for nearly eight weeks for it to be effective. Taking anti-inflammatory medications for a short period of time may treat the symptom of pain, but it will not treat the underlying problem and symptoms will come back. There is no specific medication for this condition and response to any given medication differs from person to person. If one anti-inflammatory medication does not help within 10 to 14 days, then another one will be given until one that provides relief is found.

In addition to taking medications, daily stretching in a warm shower will help. Work to reach your thumb up and behind your back. Avoid repetitive activities with your injured arm, particularly where the elbow would move above shoulder level. Avoid vacuuming, painting, raking leaves and washing the car.

If you have persistent symptoms, despite the use of oral anti-inflammatory medications, your doctor may consider a cortisone-type injection. Cortisone is a potent anti-inflammatory medication, which should be used only when necessary because it can result in weakening of muscles and tendons. Read More

Amoxicillin Usage

What is amoxicillin? How does it work (mechanism of action)?

Amoxicillin belongs to a class of antibiotics called penicillins. Other members of this class include

  • ampicillin (Unasyn),
  • piperacillin (Pipracil),
  • ticarcillin (Ticar), and
  • several others.

These antibiotics all have a similar mechanism of action. They do not directly kill bacteria, but they stop bacteria from multiplying by preventing bacteria from forming the walls that surround them. The walls are necessary to protect bacteria from their environment and to keep the contents of the bacterial cell together. Bacteria cannot survive without a cell wall. Amoxicillin is effective against many different bacteria including H. influenzae, N. gonorrhoea, E. coli, Pneumococci, Streptococci, and certain strains of Staphylococci.

The FDA approved Amoxicillin in December 1974.

What are the uses for amoxicillin (what does it treat)?

  • Amoxicillin is used to treat infections due to bacteria that are susceptible to the effects of amoxicillin.
  • Common bacterial infections that amoxicillin is used for include infections of the
    • middle ear,

Amoxicillin also is used to treat gonorrhea.

What are the side effects of amoxicillin?

Side effects due to amoxicillin include

People who are allergic to the cephalosporin class of antibiotics, which are related to the penicillins, for example, cefaclor (Ceclor), cephalexin (Keflex), and cefprozil (Cefzil), may or may not be allergic to penicillins.

Serious but rare reactions include:

Amoxicillin can alter the normal bacteria in the colon and encourage overgrowth of some bacteria such as Clostridium difficile which causes inflammation of the colon (pseudomembranous colitis). Patients who develop signs of pseudomembranous colitis after starting amoxicillin (diarrheafeverabdominal pain, and possibly shock) should contact their physician immediately.

What is the dosage for amoxicillin?

  • For most infections in adults the dose of amoxicillin is 250 mg every 8 hours, 500 mg every 8 hours, 500 mg every 12 hours or 875 mg every 12 hours, depending on the type and severity of infection.
  • For the treatment of adults with gonorrhea, the dose is 3 g given as one dose.
  • For most infections, children older than 3 months but less than 40 kg are treated with 25 or 45 mg/kg/day in divided doses every 12 hours or 20 or 40 mg/kg/day with one-third of the daily dose given every 8 hours depending on the type and severity of the infection.
  • Amoxicillin can be taken with or without food.

Which drugs or supplements interact with amoxicillin?

Amoxicillin is rarely associated with important drug interactions.

Is amoxicillin safe to take if I am pregnant or breastfeeding?

  • Penicillins are generally considered safe for use by pregnant women who are not allergic to penicillin.
  • Small amounts of amoxicillin may be excreted in breast milk and may cause diarrhea or allergic responses in nursing infants. Amoxicillin is generally considered safe to use while breastfeeding. Amoxicillin is used to treat infections in the newborn.

What else should I know about amoxicillin?

Preparations

  • Capsules: 250 and 500 mg.
  • Tablets: 500 and 875 mg.
  • Chewable tablets: 125, 200, 250, and 400 mg.
  • Powder for suspension: 50 mg/ml ; 125, 200, 250, and 400 mg/5 ml.
  • Tablet (Extended release): 775 mg

Storage

  • Amoxicillin capsules as well as the 125 and 250 mg dry powders should b e stored at or below 20 C (68 F).
  • Chewable tablets as well as 200 and 400 mg dry powders should be stored at or below 25 C(77 F).
  • Trimox capsules and unreconstituted powder should be stored at or below 20 C (68 F), and chewable tablets should be stored at room temperature 15 C to 30 C (59 F to 86 F).
  • Powder that has been mixed with water should be discarded after 14 days. Refrigeration is preferred but not required for powder mixed with water.

Other information about amoxicillin

  • Amoxicillin is available in generic form and is available by prescription only.
  • Brand names available in the US for amoxicillin are Amoxil, Moxatag, and Larotid. Read More

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