What Is Glutathione?

Glutathione is a substance made from the amino acids glycine, cysteine, and glutamic acid. It is produced naturally by the liver and involved in many processes in the body, including tissue building and repair, making chemicals and proteins needed in the body, and for the immune system.

People take glutathione by mouth for treating cataracts and glaucoma, preventing aging, treating or preventing alcoholism, asthma, cancer, heart disease (atherosclerosis and high cholesterol), hepatitis, liver disease, diseases that weaken the body’s defense system (including AIDS and chronic fatigue syndrome), memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease, osteoarthritis, and Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is also used for maintaining the body’s defense system (immune system) and fighting metal and drug poisoning.

Glutathione is breathed in (inhaled) for treating lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, and lung disease in people with HIV disease.

Healthcare providers give glutathione as a shot (by injection into the muscle) for preventing poisonous side effects of cancer treatment (chemotherapy) and for treating the inability to father a child (male infertility).

Healthcare providers also give glutathione intravenously (by injection into the vein, by IV) for preventing “tired blood” (anemia) in kidney patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment, preventing kidney problems after heart bypass surgery, treating Parkinson’s disease, improving blood flow and decreasing clotting in individuals with “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), treating diabetes, and preventing toxic side effects of chemotherapy.

How does it work?

Glutathione is involved in many processes in the body, including tissue building and repair, making chemicals and proteins needed in the body, and for the immune system.

Side Effects

Glutathione is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth, by inhalation, or by injection into the muscle or into the veins. There isn’t a lot of information available about the possible side effects of glutathione. It might cause rash when applied to the skin, or irritability in children when taken by mouth or applied to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking glutathione if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Asthma: Do not inhale glutathione if you have asthma. It can increase some asthma symptoms.

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY INJECTION INTO THE VEIN OR MUSCLE:

For chemotherapy side effects: Doses of 1.5 to 3 grams/m² of glutathione have been given in a 15-20 minute time period right before chemotherapy treatments. Also, 1.5 grams/m² of glutathione has been given over 15 minutes prior to chemotherapy plus 600 mg of glutathione injected into the muscle on days 2 to 5. Read More

HOW MUCH EXERCISE DO WE NEED?

The Body Mass Index (BMI) is a simple way for men and women to estimate body fat based on their height and weight. From the BMI, it is possible to determine your healthy weight range.

One of the limitations of BMI is that it can overpredict overweight or obesity in people who are lean and muscular. For instance, someone who is 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs 220 pounds, with 12% body fat, would be considered obese based on BMI standards. Obviously, someone with 12% body fat is not obese.

The scientists who developed the BMI guidelines readily admit to this limitation. But their rationale is that most Americans are not lean and muscular and so for most people, the BMI is an accurate assessment of body fat and increased health risk.

It is important to know that people who are classified as overweight or obese can still be healthy as long as they are fit. In one well-known study, fit people with BMIs that classified them as overweight or obese were healthier and lived longer than unfit people who were at normal weight.

The BMI, for the majority of Americans, is the most up-to-date and scientifically sound method available for determining healthy weight.

Q. Does aerobic exercise interfere with muscle gains from weightlifting?

If you’re training for an endurance event like a marathon, when you might run 60 miles or more per week, you’ll almost always see a decrease in your muscle mass. For most of us, who do more moderate amounts of physical activity, there will be minimal, if any, loss in muscle mass — so there’s nothing to worry about.

If you do plan on lots of aerobic exercise and are concerned about losing muscle, try starting with 20-30 minutes of moderate aerobic exercise (at 50% to 70% of your maximum heart rate) two to three days per week, and see how it goes.

Q. Should I hold off on weight training until I lose weight?

Absolutely not. Lifting weights will not only help you lose weight, but maintain the loss. Here’s why:

  • Muscle keeps your metabolism revved up, burning calories, fat, and glucose (sugar).
  • When you lose weight, up to 25% of the loss may come from muscle, resulting in a slower metabolismWeight lifting will help preserve or rebuild any muscle you lose by dieting.
  • Muscle helps you with aerobic exercise. The stronger you are, the better you will be at any aerobic activity.
  • Weight training improves your body’s muscle-to-fat ratio (you end up with less body fat and more muscle), which improves both your health and your fitness level.
  • Gaining muscle will help you look better as you define and tone your physique.
  • Building strength helps you feel good about yourself. Although the scale may show a slight weight gain when you start lifting weights (usually five pounds or less), you probably won’t look heavier because the gain is in muscle, and your clothes may even fit more loosely. Read More

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑