Health benefits of celery

The fiber in celery can benefit the digestive and cardiovascular systems. Celery also contains antioxidants that may play a role in preventing disease.

This article looks at the possible health benefits of celery, as well as the vegetable’s nutritional contents and some ways to prepare it.

The nutrients in the celery plant and its seeds may provide a range of health benefits.

It is worth remembering, however, that these nutrients occur in relatively small amounts in celery. Eating celery alone is not likely to prevent or cure any disease.



Preventing inflammation and cancer



Celery contains a plant compound called apigenin, which plays a role in traditional Chinese medicine as an anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, and antioxidant agent.

It may also have properties that help combat cancer.

According to the authors of a 2016 reviewTrusted Source, lab tests have shown that apigenin may contribute to apoptosis, a kind of programmed cell death, which could make it useful as a cancer treatment.

In 2015, researchers behind a studyTrusted Source in mice concluded that apigenin and apigenin-rich diets reduced the expression of certain inflammatory proteins. In this way, these substances may reduce inflammation and restore the balance of the immune system.

Celery contains a flavonoid called luteolin. The authors of an articleTrusted Source published in 2009 suggested that luteolin may have anticancer properties — it may help prevent the spread of cancer cells and induce cell death. They proposed that luteolin may make cancer cells more susceptible to attack by chemicals in treatments.

Blood pressure

Some practitioners of Chinese medicine use celery and celery extracts to reduce blood pressure.

One study looked at the effect of celery seed extracts on blood pressure in rats that either had normal blood pressure and or artificially induced hypertension.

The authors Trusted Source concluded that the extracts reduced blood pressure and raised heart rate in the rats with high blood pressure but not in those with normal blood pressure. There is no strong evidence, however, that celery seeds help lower blood pressure in humans.

Celery is also a good source of fiber, and results of a 2016 Cochrane review suggested that people with a high fiber intake may have lower blood pressure than those on a low fiber diet.

The authors called for further research to confirm their findings and to identify the precise impacts of different types of fiber.

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia refers to an increase in fatty molecules in the blood. There are often no symptoms, but it raises the long-term risk of heart disease and stroke.

A 2014 study in rodents found that celery extract reduced levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol, in rats that consumed a high-fat diet.

Meanwhile, the 2016 Cochrane review noted that people who follow a high-fiber diet appear to have lower total and LDL cholesterol levels than those who consume less fiber.

Celery is part of the Apiaceae family, which includes carrots, parsnips, parsley, and celeriac. Its crunchy stalks make the vegetable a popular low-calorie snack, and it may provide a range of health benefits.

The fiber in celery can benefit the digestive and cardiovascular systems. Celery also contains antioxidants that may play a role in preventing disease.

This article looks at the possible health benefits of celery, as well as the vegetable’s nutritional contents and some ways to prepare it.



Health benefits

The apigenin in celery may help lower inflammation.

The nutrients in the celery plant and its seeds may provide a range of health benefits.

It is worth remembering, however, that these nutrients occur in relatively small amounts in celery. Eating celery alone is not likely to prevent or cure any disease.

Neurogenesis

Apigenin may also stimulate neurogenesis, the growth and development of nerve cells.

In a 2009 study, researchers gave rats apigenin and found that it stimulated nerve cell generation and improved the ability to learn and remember.

Confirming these effects in humans, however, will require further research.

Other benefits

Some researchers have suggested that extracts from celery may also help prevent:

liver disease and jaundice,urinary tract obstruction, gout, rheumatic disorders In addition, people use celery seeds to treat: bronchitis, asthma, psoriasis and other skin disorders,vomiting, fever.

However, confirming these potential benefits of celery and celery seeds will require further research.



Nutritional contents

Celery is mainly made up of water, but it also provides dietary fiber. One 4-inch stalk of celery, weighing around 4 grams Trusted Source (g), provides about 0.1 g of fiber.

Beyond apigenin and luteolin, celery contains other plant compounds that have powerful antioxidant properties.

These include Trusted Source:

selinene, limonene, kaempferol and p-coumaric acid

Antioxidants of various kinds help prevent cellular damage caused by unstable molecules known as free radicals. The body produces these substances as a byproduct of natural processes, but if too many build up, they can be harmful.

Antioxidants help neutralize Trusted Source free radicals and prevent them from causing damage that may otherwise lead to disease development.

A stick of celery also provides small amounts of vitamin K, folate, vitamin A, potassium, and vitamin C.

Diet

People can eat celery raw or cooked.

Raw vegetables usually contain more nutrients than cooked ones. Steaming celery for 10 minutes may not affect the antioxidant contents significantly, but boiling celery may do so, according to one study.

Celery pairs well with:

cheese, dips, such as humus and peanut butter

Combining celery with cucumber, apple, spinach, and lemon can produce a tasty and healthful smoothie.

Or, try adding celery or celery seeds to:

salads, soups and risottos

Below are some recipes that dietitians recommend:

Tomato chicken soup with carrots and celery,Braised celery

Celery’s cousin, celeriac, features in: Read More

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